End of Days

28 01 2011

A few weeks late, but I just can’t let Arnold’s time in office come to a close without allotting just a moment or two to remembrance of it.  I mean…come on.  Our governor.

Free, courtesy of the suckers at Wikipedia

I’m not lying when I say that Arnold’s tenure in office strongly shaped how I view politics today.  I’m confident that he and Bush are the two happiest ex-executives in America today.

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District

5 07 2010

How could it not have been a great weekend?  I got off work at 1, and after putting all thoughts of the accumulated tasks I’d get to face on Tuesday out of my mind, Juel dropped me off at LAX and I was free to go.  Flying is something I do enjoy, even in coach – “economy” to United.  It started well, as the flight attendant asked me almost as soon as I had sat down if I would mind switching seats with a passenger in the forward “economy plus” section of the cabin who had a fear of flying.  I got to move up and gain a few inches of legroom simply because this man preferred the rear “safer” portion of the plane.  Hey, the way I see it, we’re crashing into the ground from the sky regardless in a worst-case scenario, so I’ll take the extra legroom on the way down regardless.

The lady next to me on that flight had experienced a couple of delays and missed flights getting out of Palm Springs (where a certain couple is enjoying their honeymoon), so we struck up a good conversation about the perils of traveling for work and the lame in-flight movie (How to Train your Dragon) before getting our food and drinks (not free, of course) and catching some sleep.  I got into Dulles around 12:30 local time, and while it should have been 9:30 to me (having lost three hours on the flight), flights always wipe me out, sleep or no.  John picked me up (after sneaking up on me in the baggage-claim area just to prove that he could have been a ninja if he had really wanted to) and we made the trek back to his place and collapsed in the apartment, awaiting the unbounded enjoyment of a holiday weekend.

Here are a few bullet points I want to expand upon when I’m not exhausted:

I caught four fish (in an admittedly stocked pond)

Experiencing the National Mall on July 4th

Trying to leave the National Mall on the evening of July 4th

-Waiting in line for the Metro

-Traveling on the Metro

-Realizing that we might have been better off walking the thirty miles from Dumfries, VA to D.C.

Timelessness of real friendships

Good and Ugly parts of American attitudes (see “waiting in line for the Metro”)

I’m already nodding off, probably because I got two segments of fitful three-hour sleep today, and a bit of jet lag is messing with my mind.

The fireworks were incredible, though.





Categorical Affinities

12 05 2009

In no particular order:

David Brent

Dodger Blue

High Fives

Pristine Books (next to their pristine covers) after I have finished them

Speech Impediments

The sound ice skates make on a sharp turn just before they give out

Shootout Saves

Rocking Chairs

Reading in Rocking Chairs

Letting you talk even though my vanity has so much advice for you

Splitting Snickers bars with people

Vending machines in general

The steering wheel on Tim’s old car.  Loved that thing.

Lying on the floor in an empty house

Solitude on weekends

Reading aloud with someone else in turns

Ripping open an orange with my hands without getting them sticky.  The risk is what makes it so (yes) appealing

Blue things

Blue-eyed girls

Australian animal names, because what were they thinking?

Baseball Uniforms

Making new foods

American History

Choosing to like America more than England despite my unnatural inclinations

Pretending to hate things for no good reason

The term “iceback”

Arbitrary and alliterative nicknames

The nickname I just came up with two days ago:  Squire Ire





Jackson Enraged

14 02 2009

I have to replace a picture of me (ME!) with a quote from Old Hickory?

Addressing the nullifcation of tariff laws by South Carolina, Andrew Jackon gave an impassioned oration about the value of the union.  I enjoyed this one:

Without union our independence and liberty would never have been achieved; without union they can never be maintained.  Divided into twenty-four, or even a smaller number, of separate communities, we shall see our internal trade burdened with numberless restraints and exactions; communication between distant points and sections obstructed or cut off; our sons made soldiers to deluge with blood the fields they now till in peace; the mass of our people borne down and imporverished by taxes to support armies and navies, and military leaders at the head of their victorious legions becoming our lawgivers and judges.  The loss of liberty, of all good government, of peace, plenty. and happiness, must inevitably follow a dissolution of the Union.  In supporting it, therefore, we support all that is dear to the freeman and the philanthropist.

The time at which I stand before you is full of interest.  The eyes of all nations are fixed on our Republic.  The event of the existing crisis will be decisive in the opinion of mankind of the practicability of our federal system of government.  Great is the stake placed in our hands; great is the responsibility which must rest upon the people of the United States.  Let us realize the importance of the attitude in which we stand before our country from the dangers which surround it and learn wisdom from the lessons they inculcate.

Another excerpt from the same book:

Six days later, the president named a postmaster for New Salem, Illinois, a twenty-four-year-old lawyer who had lost a race for the state legislature.  He was a [Henry] Clay man, but the post was hardly major, and Abraham Lincoln was happy to accept the appointment.

From American Lion, by Jon Meacham





In Defense of the Union

4 02 2009

I’m currently reading American Lion, a biography of President Andrew Jackson.  It called to my attention one of the greatest speeches by one of the greatest orators America has ever seen.  Daniel Webster happened to pass by the Senate during a debate about South Carolina, nullification, and state’s rights.  The next day, he spoke in response to Robert Hayne, who had given a stirring and engaging defense of South Carolina’s inclination to propagate open disdain (if not outright rebellion) for the government, which had passed new tariff legislation lately that met with widespread disgust.  Anyway, I’ll spare you from further background information, as its better read in its context anyway.  While Webster disagreed with Jackson on almost everything, and quite vehemently, these two men were undoubtedly united in their thinking about the importance of keeping the union intact.

Webster closed his argument thusly:

I have not allowed myself, Sir, to look beyond the Union, to see what might lie hidden in the dark recess behind. I have not coolly weighed the chances of preserving liberty when the bonds that unite us together shall be broken asunder. I have not accustomed myself to hang over the precipice of disunion, to see whether, with my short sight, I can fathom the depth of the abyss below; nor could I regard him as a safe counselor in the affairs of this government, whose thoughts should be mainly bent on considering, not how the Union may be best preserved, but how tolerable might be the condition of the people when it should be broken up and destroyed. While the Union lasts, we have high, exciting, gratifying prospects spread out before us and our children. Beyond that I seek not to penetrate the veil. God grant that in my day, at least, that curtain may not rise! God grant that on my vision never may be opened what lies behind! When my eyes shall be turned to behold for the last time the sun in heaven, may I not see him shining on the broken and dishonored fragments of a once glorious Union; on States dissevered, discordant, belligerent; on a land rent with civil feuds, or drenched, it may be, in fraternal blood! Let their last feeble and lingering glance rather behold the gorgeous ensign of the republic, now known and honored throughout the earth, still full high advanced, its arms and trophies streaming in their original lustre, not a stripe erased or polluteddd, not a single star obscured, bearing for its motto, no such miserable interrogatory as “What is all this worth?” nor those other words of delusion and folly, “Liberty first and Union afterwards”; but everywhere, spread all over in characters of living light, placing on all its ample folds, as they float over the sea and over the land, and in every wind under the whole heavens, that other sentiment, dear to every true American heart, – Liberty and Union, now and for ever, one and inseparable!